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Bariatric Surgery Reduces Risk for Microvascular Complications in Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes

Patients with obesity and either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes saw a reduced, long-term risk for microvascular complications (diabetic retinopathy, diabetic kidney disease) after having bariatric surgery compared with similar patients who received usual care, according to new findings from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study. Researchers analyzed data from 4,032 patients aged 37 to 60 years recruited for the non-randomized SOS study between September 1987 and January 2001. The most common observed microvascular complication was diabetic retinopathy, which was reduced after bariatric surgery across all glycemic subgroups. “Our research shows that prediabetes is a serious condition that should be treated, and that this can be done by bariatric surgery,” the study’s lead investigator commented.

Once again, diabetes and bariatric surgery in the news.

Once again, the data demonstrates effectiveness in treating this chronic, relentless, deadly disease.

Once again we reiterate that we specialize in this care with the desire to make it as patient friendly and widely available as possible because of the MANY success stories which we have seen.
Once again, it’s up to you. Eyesight and kidney function are good things.

Call us, We can Help!
The Team at NJBI

American workers may amount to billions in lost productivity

The indirect costs of absenteeism and presenteeism associated with overweight and obesity among American workers may amount to more than $900 billion ($6,000 per employee) in annual lost productivity. The numbers are sobering, and U.S. employers may be increasingly open to implementing policies that recognize the interconnectedness of community health, workplace environments, employee productivity, and company profitability.

This is one reason why American businesses may no longer be competitive in the world markets. It’s only a matter of time until the employer pushes the healthcare costs to the employee, or begins to stratify their employees based on cost to the company.  In either case, the decisions will be business based and forced due to the costs cited above.  We at NJBI exist to aid our patients in avoiding the real consequences associated with their weight, both medical and social.  Obesity is a growing problem with many layers affecting the lives of those who have it.

Bariatric surgery works. Its an effective means of getting out of the trap created by the obesity. Its what we do, and why we do it.

Call us, We can Help!

The Team at NJBI

Genetic Forms of Obesity Are Rare Yet Numerous

Read Full Story on CNN

 

While scientists have been aware of about two dozen genetic conditions that can cause obesity, a new study published in the journal Obesity Reviews finds there are many more. Canadian investigators have identified and cataloged 79 rare genetic syndromes where obesity is a key symptom. Researchers say their work will be helpful to the millions worldwide who have lost control of their weight for reasons other than genetics. The researchers analyzed 161 papers and found 79 obesity syndromes reported in the scientific literature. Of the 79 syndromes identified, 19 had the genetics worked out completely so that a simple lab test would be able to confirm the condition. Another 11 had been partially clarified, while 27 had been mapped to a chromosomal region. For the remaining 22 syndromes, researchers had not yet identified the genes or location along the chromosomes. “If you know the gene and the function of the gene, then you know which biological mechanism is defective,” said the senior author of the study This knowledge of obesity genetics, then, can be applied to more common forms of the condition, he added.

What Works to Help Overweight Folks Eat Healthier?

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Giving adults a handout about nutrition may be help in getting overweight adults to adopt new heart-healthy eating habits, new research suggests. Researchers looked at three ways of encouraging healthy habits by randomly assigning more than 900 overweight adults to one of four groups. One group received advice about diet through phone calls. Another got a weekly food basket but no advice about diet. The third group got both advice and food baskets. A fourth group, used as “controls,” did not receive advice or food baskets. Everybody in each group got a “food guide” handout about diet. Six months later, participants overall had only slightly increased their consumption of healthier foods like fruits and vegetables, regardless of group. The researchers said the only consistent increases were seen in the group that received both food and advice. By 18 months, that slight increase in healthy eating was dwindling, however, weight and blood pressure dipped in all the groups, including the control group, according to the study, which was published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. “These data demonstrate the difficulty in effectively promoting fruit, vegetable and whole grain cereals to the general population using recommendations that, when followed, decrease risk factors for chronic disease,” said the study’s lead investigator.

Is anybody surprised by this? Is this not exactly like every government program you have ever heard of which was designed for the public benefit but which hasn’t worked? Has there EVER been a program which works in legislating people’s behavior? Does anyone besides a politician believe that this would be effective?

No way! No one wants to be told what they can and cannot do. Particularly in the realm of their personal food choices. It’s why diets and exercise programs are not the answer and never will be. They will ALWAYS fail unless it is the CHOICE of the individual. Sort and long term. It HAS to come from within.

THAT’S WHY BARIATRIC SURGERY WORKS! It is the patient’s choice! The changes in intake volume, coupled with the changes in desire for foods lead to weight loss and in the majority of situations, SUSTAINED weight loss. The weight loss happens initially through the surgical changes, but the long term is driven by the patients. THEY maintain it after surgery where NO ONE does based on some outside mandate as demonstrated above.

Do it for yourself.

Call us, We can Help!
The Team at NJBI

Obesity Strongly Linked to 11 Types of Cancer

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People who have obesity have a greater risk of developing and dying from several types of cancer including malignancies of the breast, ovary, kidney, pancreas, colon, rectum and bone marrow, a new research review confirms. The researchers rule out the possibility that it was due to chance. They found the strongest links were between obesity and malignancies of the digestive organs and for hormone-related tumors in women. Increases in BMI were tied to a higher risk of developing cancers in the esophagus, bone marrow, biliary tract system, pancreas and kidney. Upticks in BMI were also linked to greater odds of colon and rectal cancers in men as well as endometrial malignancies in younger women. The findings were published in the British Medical Journal.

Cancer Bad. Obesity Bad. Outcome of both, shorter life and eventual death.

Options? Bariatric surgery, Bariatric surgery, Bariatric surgery.

When you look at the two sides, you realize that you have to look deeper into the prospect of surgery. When you do that (See our You Tube Videos), you realize that your initial concerns may have been based on misperceptions. When you weigh the two, there is no longer any controversy.

Bariatric surgery saves lives. Short term and long term. It just works.

Check the data, do the research. There is no chemo or radiation treatment which can match its numbers.

It’s your choice.

Call us, We can help!
The NJBI Team

Bariatric Surgery Reduces Risk for Microvascular Complications in Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes

Read Full Article >

Patients with obesity and either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes saw a reduced, long-term risk for microvascular complications (diabetic retinopathy, diabetic kidney disease) after having bariatric surgery compared with similar patients who received usual care, according to new findings from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study. Researchers analyzed data from 4,032 patients aged 37 to 60 years recruited for the nonrandomized SOS study between September 1987 and January 2001. The most common observed microvascular complication was diabetic retinopathy, which was reduced after bariatric surgery across all glycemic subgroups. “Our research shows that prediabetes is a serious condition that should be treated, and that this can be done by bariatric surgery,” the study’s lead investigator commented.

Once again, diabetes and bariatric surgery in the news – Once again, the data demonstrates effectiveness in treating this chronic, relentless, deadly disease.

Once again we reiterate that we specialize in this care with the desire to make it as patient friendly and widely available as possible because of the MANY success stories which we have seen.

Once again, it’s up to you. Eyesight and kidney function are good things.

Call us, We can Help!
The Team at NJBI

Adults who eat at home with TV off may have lower likelihood of obesity, study suggests

The Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics reports that research suggests “adults who never watch TV during family meals and eat mostly home-cooked food are much less likely than others to be obese.” While previous “research has suggested that more frequent family meals are linked to lower obesity,” the new study indicated that “eating at home, rather than out, and without the television on, was tied to lower obesity risk regardless of how often family was present.”


Take the TV out of the kitchen or keep it off.

The commercials are overwhelmingly about food and designed for distraction.  It goes back to what your mother likely told you:  The TV is the “idiot box” and you need to use it sparingly.

At NJBI, we spend a lot of time educating patients that they should sit down and concentrate on the process of eating after surgery in order to develop healthy habits and behaviors when their appetite is a non issue.  Part of that becomes carving out time to concentrate on food selection and literally processing it as you eat.  Recognizing satisfaction and signals of fullness are also important.  All of these items suffer if you are distracted by a TV, or anything else for that matter.

There are droves of studies defining tangible benefits of families sitting down and eating together.  Its how the business of the day gets processed and discussed in many houses.  Its good for everyone.  This simply is one more study recognizing that.

In a world of distractions – TV, internet, constantly streaming music and cellular phones, it becomes hard to disconnect.  It’s important though.  Carve out the “quiet time.”  Slow down, live in the present.  The odds are overwhelming that you will be glad that you did, and better for it.

Best in Health,

The Team at NJBI

Physicians debate bariatric surgery as “last best hope” for obese teens

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In a nearly 1,900-word article, the New York Times (2/24, Kolata, Subscription Publication) reported that as the number of “severely obese” teenagers has “nearly doubled” between 1999 and 2014, “more and more” physicians “and parents are facing a difficult question: Should very heavy teenagers have bariatric surgery, a radical operation that is the only treatment proved to produce lasting weight loss in severely obese people?” The Times stated that surgery is the “last best hope” for a number of these teens, although “scientists say there’s an urgent need for more ambitious research.” According to the Times, “The question for teens and their parents is: Which is worse – accepting uncertainty about the long term health risks from surgery or the likelihood of serious health risks from remaining obese?”


This article seems to be generating controversy due to the teens being the subject matter.  I think people are missing the boat. Why would the commentary apply only to teens?  The basic bottom line is that the decision discussed is just as pertinent for the parents considering the implications of the article, as well as their grandparents and their doctors for that matter.  Anyone who is obese.

Patients with obesity regardless of age are faced with tough choices.  The devil you know: death and disability from obesity related causes as well as a degradation in quality of life vs. the unknown: surgery and it’s possible complications.

Seems a much more simple choice for those of us who work in the field becaiuse we live the reality every day, but one which MUST be made by the individual.

Do the research.  Look at the Math. There are VERY FEW reasons NOT to pursue surgery.

It’s up to you.

Call us, We can help!

Dr Bertha and the NJBI Team